10 ways to get what you want, without violating your conscience (Part 2)

The greatest ability in business is the ability to influence; it’s at the core of leading, deal-making and problem solving. This post continues last week’s exploration of the 10 principles master influencers use to outperform their peers. Employed correctly, they’ll make you more persuasive, while enhancing credibility.

The five discussed last week were: (1) Visibility, (2) Supply-Control, (3) Negative Sensibility, (4) Authority and (5) Highlighter principles – you can find the post here.

Here are principles 6-10 to get what you want:

6.   The Evidence Principle. This principle is one you likely know well – information that’s backed up with research, experiences or, in the best case, the firsthand knowledge of the listener, is very persuasive. For example, when you borrow an experience from someone like Steve Jobs, you’re pretty hard to disagree with! Even CEOs need help to sell their vision. It’s often why they spend millions on management consultants like McKinsey & Company. Convincing their bosses (the Board of Directors and, ultimately, the investors) to make BIG changes (e.g. entering new markets, restructuring a business, selling a business) can be very difficult. It can even get you fired. Enter McKinsey as the “safe” way to sell tough decisions and earn trust. The more difficult the audience, the more evidence you’ll need to get what you want.

7.   The Likability Principle. It’s simple. People are influenced by those they trust. People trust people they like. People like those who are similar to them. The best influencers apply this principle by talking to people in their own language, listening actively, tapping into genuine common interests and experiences, empathizing, and communicating openness and accessibility. The only watch-outs here are don’t try TOO hard to be liked or be inauthentic, or your efforts will backfire.

8.   The Reciprocity Principle. Studies have shown that it is a general social rule that a person should try to repay fairly what we have received from another person (see this post for sources and more info). If somebody performs a favour for us, we usually feel obliged to return their favour. Since what goes around comes around, influencers regularly help others. Servant leadership is an excellent example of this principle in action.

9.   The Experience Principle. Confucius wrote: “I hear and I know. I see and I believe. I do and I understand.” He was spot on. Influencers apply this principle by involving their audience emotionally and visually in their objective. Story telling is the best way to do this. It helps your audience connect with your message by creating a “virtual experience”.

10.    The Passion Principle. Harrison Monarth described this principle well: “Passion can’t be explained. It is felt. Whenever you are looking to influence someone to accept your ideas and share your vision, you have to have a feeling that energizes…and stimulates the heart as well as the mind. It doesn’t come easily, think about it and focus your thoughts on the aspects of the idea that you can feel in your gut. Then amplify that feeling and share your message.”

I would love to hear your thoughts on effective influencing. Is there a principle 11 that should be added to the list? Join the conversation by sending me an email or commenting on my post.

Thanks for reading.

Source: Executive Presence by Harrison Monarth.

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